These kitchen storage solutions can be incorporated into existing space, a remodel or new construction

The hardest- working room in your home often presents the most storage challenges, but also the most storage opportunities.

We are all familiar with the flip-down drawer below the kitchen sink for sponges and scrubbers, or appliance garages, but here I offer about a dozen additional options you may not have considered. Each can be incorporated into your existing kitchen, a remodel or new construction. Some are definitely DIY-appropriate, while you might prefer to hire a contractor for others. As with most home improvements, a comprehensive – rather than piecemeal – plan conceived in conjunction with someone with some degree of expertise is the smartest approach.

When we think about storage, there are both concealed and visible options. Homeowners have to decide how much of the latter they can tolerate and then try to build in as much of the former as possible to manage the rest.

Concealed storage Of the concealed variety, drawers, cabinets and pantries are the workhorses of most kitchens, with open shelving gaining popularity today. Most homeowners have long stored stacks of plates in upper cabinets, but folks are realizing that heavy plates are more easily lifted up than lifted down. This is where large lower drawers come into play. Consider inserting a movable peg system into a deep drawer to securely accommodate stacks of plates with varying diameters.

Similarly practical are deep drawers for pots with integrated rollouts in the upper portion to hold lids or flatter items, like trivets or even potholders. Another deep-drawer system for pots includes a partition at the back to hold the lids.

Lazy Susans are often installed in corners to make use of that deep under-counter space, but you might consider corner drawers instead. Though the shape of these drawers results in a pair of triangular-shaped compartments in the front, small items like spice jars fit there nicely. And these drawers’ narrow width and extra depth is generally welcome.

In regard to virtually all drawers and cabinets, one word comes to mind: retractable. Retractable shelves, baskets and the like dramatically increase the functionality of these spaces. For upper cabinets, consider pull-downs so that items in the back are easily reachable.

We don’t typically think about seating in relation to storage, but seating does take up valuable real estate in a kitchen eating area, like a bar or island. Why not consider vintage-style swivel stools that tuck out of sight when not in use but easily rotate into place as needed?

A simple solution is to store some items in an adjacent area like a breakfast room, dining room or even living space. But what about the stairs? While most people who live in two-story homes have already made use of their under-stair storage space, usually in the form of a closet, many people have not considered converting the bottom few stairs to drawers. Someone with building expertise should take on this task, as the strength and stability of the stairs must not be compromised. It would be so handy to store flatter items like trays, cutting boards, baking sheets or place mats in these stair drawers, since, in many homes, they are located near the kitchen and dining room.

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Visible storage One of the sleekest visible storage solutions is a kitchen rail system. Generally stainless steel, this type of system may not be appropriate for all styles of kitchens, but it places within easy reach frequently used tools and other items. This frees up drawer, cabinet and counter space . Depending on the system, which is typically installed beneath upper cabinets or floating shelving, homeowners can choose between a highly functional and handsome range of components to mix and match with their rails and brackets: mini-shelves, cylindrical utensil holders, rectangular compartments, herb pots and much more.

For those who don’t mind a somewhat fuller look, shelves above windows or doorways can create a great deal of storage space for both decorative and functional items.

If cabinet space is limited, but floor space is less so, an attractive lidded or unlidded basket might be the ideal place to stand up cutting and bread boards. Keep in mind that if you have a pet who sheds, fur may collect in or around the basket.

If pantry space is also limited, consider decanting your herbs and spices into small magnetic canisters and adhering them to the side of your fridge, assuming one side is open and conveniently located to your stove or food preparation area.

And speaking of counters, one of our favorite uncommon solutions is a countertop with an integrated bowl or seamless depression in the surface of the counter meant to prevent eggs and other round fruits and vegetables from rolling off the counter.

Another is a cutting board with a hole positioned over a receptacle so that trimmings can easily be swept into the waste bin, and conveniently removed.

Hopefully, some of these ideas may solve some of your stickiest storage issues.

If you have a question about building, remodeling or storage solutions – or have a storage solution you would like to share – please send them to me at chris@vbhomesliving.com.

Chris Ettel is founding partner of VB Homes. He serves on the Tidewater Builders Association board of directors, served as past chairman of the TBA Remodelers Council and is a longtime board member of the Virginia Beach Public Schools Education Foundation. For more information, go to www.vbhomesliving.com.

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Looking to Remodel Your Kitchen

Take a look at this gorgeous North End remodeled kitchen! Our client wanted a beachy look for their new kitchen design. Call us at 757-491-1996 or visit our website vbhomesliving.com for us to design your next kitchen. #vbhomes #virginiabeach #remodel #kitchendesign #kitchen #beachhouse #coastaldesign

 

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Picture: North End Custom Home in Virginia Beach, VA

Kitchen upgrades that make the grade

The frenzy of cooking and family togetherness of Thanksgiving is now past. And if this favorite culinary-centric season left you thinking that the heart of your home is in need of a serious upgrade before next year’s feast rolls around – say, opening up the space to adjacent rooms – we are here to help you make the grade with an abbreviated checklist of sorts. Just think A-F and you’ll leave no stone(ware) unturned.

 

A

Aesthetics: Of course you want your kitchen, the hub of your home, to look terrific. As you begin to plan your remodel – a process that should take longer than the actual construction – one of the questions to ask yourself is whether you want a kitchen that looks like a kitchen – often a more modernist approach – one that looks like another room in your home, or something that’s somewhere in between. Your answer will drive many of your aesthetic decisions about what to conceal or reveal and whether to include furniture-style details.

Appliances: Among the many obvious appliance decisions related to aesthetics and function, a couple of key considerations are whether you need one oven or two, as well as whether a microwave oven is as indispensable as it once was. Most homeowners need two ovens only once or twice a year, and many are ready to jettison the microwave. An increasingly popular decision is to select a single oven and a dual-purpose combination microwave-convection oven. As for ranges, be sure that whatever model you choose is vented to the outside. Hearth, mantel and chimney-style range hoods will help transform this, the hardest working appliance in your kitchen, into a handsome focal point.

B

Budget: Kitchen remodels are not inexpensive, depending on the extent of the remodel. But these $30K-$50K jobs enhance the livability of one’s home immeasurably. And while it is unlikely that you will recoup more than 65 percent to 70 percent of the cost should you sell your home, your inviting kitchen just might be what sets your property apart from others on the market.

C

Cabinetry: Based on the clutter factor, most homeowners still prefer closed, solid wood cabinets. But many possibilities exist for combining closed cabinets with open shelving. Soffits, unless they hide ductwork, are a thing of the past. Yet cabinets that stretch to the ceiling create hard-to-reach space at the top. One attractive solution is lighted, glass-enclosed cubby holes for display. Another is to stagger cabinet height so that some reach the ceiling and others don’t, creating an airier feeling.

Countertops: Natural stones like granite and marble are practically unbeatable for their “natural” beauty, but they are porous. Hence, sealing is recommended. Yet, most people don’t do it, so don’t let that be a deterrent. Soapstone, with a range of colors limited to whites and grays, is also natural, but is nonporous and more pliable, meaning it is less likely to crack from stress or weight. Slate, too, is nonporous, but it comes in a somewhat wider range of colors than soapstone, and is more affordable than granite or marble. Engineered quartz countertops – ground quartz mixed with polymer resins – are durable but more expensive. Concrete is heavy, sometimes requiring additional reinforcement. Do your research before making an informed decision for your application.

D

Design: While you could certainly serve as your own designer/contractor, professionals can see past the limitations that often limit homeowners’ imaginations about what could be. Plus, professionals are not only trained to solve functional and aesthetic problems that crop up in a kitchen, but they know how to avoid painful design mistakes from the outset.

E

Efficiency: The equilateral “work triangle” from refrigerator to range to sink is still a fundamental principle in kitchen design. Avoid letting your desire for the highly sought-after “eat-at” center island upset the flow by incorporating one of the points of the triangle into the island.

Extras: It is easy to become seduced by these bells and whistles: “instant hot” dispensers, pot fillers, warming drawers and many more. Think carefully about which of these sometimes costly add-ons will really provide increased functionality.

F

Fixtures: The importance of lighting can scarcely be underestimated in a kitchen, whether overhead or under-cabinet task lighting, preferably on dimmers. Though recessed lighting is popular, consider flush mounted fixtures for all-over brightness absent that “surgical suite” feel. And, while pendant lighting adds pizazz, pick a style that won’t leave your friends and family seeing spots.

Flooring: Wood is edging out tile for kitchens because of its warmth, both literally and figuratively. Even sealed, though, it is not impervious to water, especially in a leak situation. A possible happy-medium is ceramic wood-look tile.

Though this checklist barely scratches the surface, it hopefully lays the groundwork for top marks on your kitchen upgrade.

For more kitchen tips visit our website at vbhomesliving.com