Exterior Siding and Cladding

Building or remodeling a home is usually based on space needs and aesthetics. One of the most public decisions regarding appearance is surely your choice of siding material. But I encourage you to also consider other factors when choosing this all-important material, especially factors like protection, durability and, realistically, how willing you are to maintain it. Also, if you have a homeowners association, your selection may require its approval. Following are more specific considerations, alphabetized by type of material:

BRICK Nothing says “built-to-last” like brick. In our area, many of the middle-century ranch homes, as well as Colonial- and Tudor-style homes, are clad in brick or brick veneer. The latter requires a moisture barrier between the veneer and the home’s wooden frame. Bricks, which are made from fired clay, come in a wide range of rich and subtle colors, but they are labor-intensive to install – and they can be more difficult to match if you ever add on – so be sure to include that installation cost in your tally.yu3a0462

Example of Fiber-Cement Siding

FIBER-CEMENT SIDING Fiber-cement siding may be the best option for many homeowners. Not only does its natural look mimic masonry, stucco or wood with less expense, but it is low maintenance while resisting flames and termites. Expert installation helps ensure you will encounter no moisture-related issues from this product, which is available in a spectrum of colors, styles and textures. Expect it to last from 25 to 50 years.

STONE Stone and natural or synthetic stone veneer (lighter weight and less expensive), if chosen with restraint – otherwise it can look gaudy – provides long-lasting natural beauty and durability. Texture and visual interest are its hallmarks, as is its cost. So stone may be a good choice to combine with another material, adding visual interest to selected architectural features, like around a front entrance.

STUCCO Stucco, familiar to most of us from Spanish Mission- and Mediterranean-style homes, is typically made of sand, Portland cement, lime and water. It requires a moisture barrier and galvanized metal screening underneath for protection. Installation is of paramount importance to prevent cracks from developing in this rigid material. Dryvit is a synthetic stucco-look material that was very popular in our area years back, but got a bad rap due to costly moisture problems resulting from improper installation. Exterior Insulation and Finish System, or EIFS (polystyrene panels with an acrylic coating), is the broader term for synthetic stucco, which is still a viable option, provided it is installed by professionals and maintained properly. The latter includes regular inspection of the surface for punctures, especially after a storm, and the caulked joints – which real stucco does not have – for damage. Other limitations include that EIFS siding should not touch the ground where it could potentially soak up ground water, nor should it have anything attached to it, like a mailbox or flag pole, that could puncture the surface.

VINYL SIDING Vinyl siding is the most popular choice, offering low cost of material and installation, versatility of colors and styles, low maintenance, durability and, should you be a DIYer, installation that you could potentially take on yourself. If you can get past its “plastic” appearance, it may be your best option.

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Example of Vinyl Siding

WOOD For a rich, organic, authentic look, wood – available as clapboard or lap siding, shakes and shingles – is hard to beat. Especially appropriate for bungalow-, Cape Cod- and cottage-style homes, as we know from examples of historic architectures, wood is durable if it is maintained properly. And in our coastal climate, staying on top of that requires real commitment to painting and staining. Wood is also attractive to critters, but it can be treated for fire-retardance. Western red cedar and redwood are thought to offer the most visual appeal and durability. When figuring the cost, be sure to figure in more labor-intensive installation as well as finishing.

Send questions to chris@vbhomesliving.com. Virginia Beach native and JMU graduate Chris Ettel is founding partner of VB Homes. Ettel serves on the Tidewater Builders Association board of directors and is past chairman of the TBA Remodeler’s Council.

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Summer Newsletter

Derby Brackett has enjoyed a long love affair with Virginia Beach. Originally from Richmond, she spent many summers, weekends and holidays at her family’s oceanfront cottage on 62nd Street. As an adult with a family of her own, she continued making trips to Virginia Beach. When Derby’s mother passed away in 2010, the 62nd Street cottage was left to her and her brother. They decided to sell the property but Derby knew she couldn’t stay away for long.

She and her husband, Doug, spent a year looking for the perfect lot to build on. They discovered a gem on Atlantic Avenue between 59th and 60th streets, a mere block from the ocean and less than 3 blocks from the original family getaway home. VB Homes owned the lot and once she and Doug met with Chris Ettel and his team, it was easy to choose both the lot and VB Homes.

Must-haves for the new home included a central kitchen and open plan on the second floor, as well as a porch and deck on this level. Derby and Doug also wanted flexible living and sleeping space on the first floor to accommodate their large family of 6 children and 6 grandchildren.

Outside of the layout, Derby had another heartfelt request. The original 1960’s vacation home on 62nd Street was designed with 2-inch thick heart pine floors and pine doors with door latches instead of knobs. VB Homes salvaged some of the pieces and used them on the new home’s second floor. “The house now has the soul of the old home and the heart of our new home,” said Derby.

Completed in August, 2014, the final result was a 2,900 square foot home designed with an ocean blue Hardie plank exterior framed in white trim, and three levels of space that fit the Bracketts’ lifestyle perfectly. An open second floor lets Derby cook and entertain simultaneously and features a deep copper sink as the focal point for the kitchen design. The third floor master bedroom is a cozy escape with calming blue walls and a deck offering ocean views. The incorporation of the 62nd Street home’s floors and doors is a wow factor for guests.

Derby and Doug now live in Virginia Beach year-round. The Bracketts quickly embraced the North End preference for bikes as the primary mode of transportation. Thanksgiving has become a traditional hosting holiday for Derby and Doug, with all 18 family members joining them in 2016. Derby said, “I never thought we would be settled so quickly here. It is definitely the right spot for us.”

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Before and After Renovations

Check out this before and after exterior renovation in Bay Island. Let VB Homes design your next remodel project by calling us at 757-491-1996 or visiting our website vbhomesliving.com

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