Summer Newsletter

Derby Brackett has enjoyed a long love affair with Virginia Beach. Originally from Richmond, she spent many summers, weekends and holidays at her family’s oceanfront cottage on 62nd Street. As an adult with a family of her own, she continued making trips to Virginia Beach. When Derby’s mother passed away in 2010, the 62nd Street cottage was left to her and her brother. They decided to sell the property but Derby knew she couldn’t stay away for long.

She and her husband, Doug, spent a year looking for the perfect lot to build on. They discovered a gem on Atlantic Avenue between 59th and 60th streets, a mere block from the ocean and less than 3 blocks from the original family getaway home. VB Homes owned the lot and once she and Doug met with Chris Ettel and his team, it was easy to choose both the lot and VB Homes.

Must-haves for the new home included a central kitchen and open plan on the second floor, as well as a porch and deck on this level. Derby and Doug also wanted flexible living and sleeping space on the first floor to accommodate their large family of 6 children and 6 grandchildren.

Outside of the layout, Derby had another heartfelt request. The original 1960’s vacation home on 62nd Street was designed with 2-inch thick heart pine floors and pine doors with door latches instead of knobs. VB Homes salvaged some of the pieces and used them on the new home’s second floor. “The house now has the soul of the old home and the heart of our new home,” said Derby.

Completed in August, 2014, the final result was a 2,900 square foot home designed with an ocean blue Hardie plank exterior framed in white trim, and three levels of space that fit the Bracketts’ lifestyle perfectly. An open second floor lets Derby cook and entertain simultaneously and features a deep copper sink as the focal point for the kitchen design. The third floor master bedroom is a cozy escape with calming blue walls and a deck offering ocean views. The incorporation of the 62nd Street home’s floors and doors is a wow factor for guests.

Derby and Doug now live in Virginia Beach year-round. The Bracketts quickly embraced the North End preference for bikes as the primary mode of transportation. Thanksgiving has become a traditional hosting holiday for Derby and Doug, with all 18 family members joining them in 2016. Derby said, “I never thought we would be settled so quickly here. It is definitely the right spot for us.”

YU3A6000YU3A6027YU3A5451YU3A5459YU3A5453YU3A5454YU3A5457YU3A5461YU3A5469YU3A5472YU3A5480YU3A5513YU3A5484YU3A5488YU3A5491YU3A5499YU3A5500

Looking to Move to the Beach

Great opportunity to move to the beach! Two new homes in development on 55th Street and Atlantic Avenue. Call VB Homes today for more information at 757-491-1996 or visit our website vbhomesliving.com

#beach home #northend #oceanfront #virginiabeach #customhome #coastal home #beach #beachliving

 

IMG_6649

 

Better design the key for great outdoor spaces on any budget

A fireplace anchors one of the outdoor living spaces at the Ettel home, May 22, 2014.

There is nothing wrong with a backyard grill and a couple of Adirondack chairs. However, if you are at a point in your life where you want your outdoor spaces to feel more like your indoor spaces, consider our tips for better design regardless of budget.

First, decide on the extent of your transformation. Do you want a simple patio or deck, or is a series of outdoor rooms more to your liking? If the latter, yet your budget is tight, consider creating an overall design that can be installed in phases for a result with cohesive flow.

Regardless of the size of your project, consider how you want the outdoor spaces to function. Is it for dining, cooking, conversation, lounging, recreation? How will they connect to the indoors visually and physically? How will they connect to each other and relate to surrounding areas.

Outdoor spaces that aren’t easily accessible, regardless of how beautifully appointed, are not likely to get much use. So consider the inside-to-outside transitions from both the interior and exterior perspectives.

Zones can be established in a number of ways like shifts in hardscaping materials from, say, concrete pavers to brick, or defining boundaries through the placement of planters and plantings. Regardless, moving between zones should feel seamless.

Traffic patterns can be established in similar ways to create spaces that unfold into each other through simple openings or down more formal walkways. If the latter, a curve to help create a sense of discovery is nice.

Always consider the “borrowed landscape” or what lies beyond the areas you are developing, taking advantage of attractive features and views and minimizing or camouflaging those that aren’t, like your neighbor’s shed.

With your plan mapped out, next consider focal points for each area, including sources of fire and water. A full-size fireplace will draw people to it outdoors just as it will indoors, or perhaps more so. But so will a more flexible and affordable fire pit if your space or budget is restrictive. Just be sure to consult building codes in relation to fire safety. Water features, whether an extensive pond or a tabletop fountain, provide both beauty and soothing sounds. Other focal points might include a specimen tree, a garden wall or trellis, or a piece of sculpture.

Provide a variety of seating options for people of all ages: low, high, stationary, portable, rigid and upholstered. Maybe even a swing or hammock. But coordinate colors, styles, and materials and limit the number to avoid a cluttered look. For upholstered furniture, invest in fabrics that can take a beating from the sun and that dry quickly. Overhead, consider some protection from the sun in the form of pergolas, umbrellas or awnings.

And lastly, have some fun decorating your spaces to engage all of the senses and create visual interest in support of your focal points. Be thoughtful in your selection of shapes, colors, and textures in both manmade and natural materials: accent tables, candles and outdoor-rated lighting, throw pillows, rugs, planters, decorative objects, rocks, and plant materials, including some with scents.

Whether your outdoor areas have a kicked-back Parrothead vibe, country-cottage charm, or sleek South Beach sophistication each should be a function of your personal style combined with the style of your home. Outdoor spaces can offer surprise elements perhaps not found inside your home, but generally a few repeated elements, colors, or motifs ensure a more satisfying and harmonious look and feel between indoors and out.

If an outdoor kitchen is in your budget, be sure to read next month’s column. The considerations are many – materials, location, appliances, storage, work surfaces, and ambiance – and we will get you cookin’ outdoors in comfort, safety, and style.

Chris Ettel is founding partner of VB Homes. He serves on the Tidewater Builders Association board of directors, serves as past chairman of the TBA Remodelers Council and is a longtime board member of the Virginia Beach Public Schools Education Foundation. For more information, go to www.vbhomesliving.com.